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No human person ever hated PHP safe mode as much as I do.

No human person ever hated PHP safe mode as much as I do. published on 2 Comments on No human person ever hated PHP safe mode as much as I do.

And I didn’t even understand what it was this morning.

I’ve been thinking of moving my websites over to Nearly Free Speech, because I’m kind of sick of A Small Orange’s downtime issues. But it turns out that Nearly Free Speech never, ever turn off safe mode. And I really kind of need WordPress to be able to write to the server, a thing which safe mode is extremely reluctant to allow. I’ve been trying for four hours to make it work, because I keep thinking I’m mere seconds away from a breakthrough – ’cause, see, according to this page, just changing the whole install’s group to “web” ought to fix the problem. But even though I’m allegedly supposed to have shell access when I do the whole SSH thing, and be able to do that, I still get nonsense-sleep-talk error messages when I try to change files’ groups and users.

I was kind of hoping that writing that paragraph might inspire me to a solution, but it’s not happening.

Fuck it. I’m going to go read manga where vampires go to high school.

2 Comments

I know this is old, but it comes up in search results.

PHP safe mode is a good thing. Just search through the FAQ on nearly free speech, they explain why this issue is complex.

I’m aware that there are reasons to keep it enabled – particularly on a shared hosting environment, or for a WordPress-etc user who might end up installing an insecure plugin – but I don’t think it’s an unqualified good thing even for users experienced with permissions and shell commands. For example, the fact that this can become an issue is, in my opinion, a problem.